⎯⎯Public Writing⎯⎯


Public scholarship and academic essays written for a general audience

“Aesthetic Activism and the Quest for Authenticity in a Time of Crisis”
Mediapolis (June 12, 2021)

This solicited essay contributes to a roundtable on the topic of “lockdown aesthetics and gentrification.” My essay focuses on how the aesthetics of blackness have been co-opted in the gentrifying city during a period of crisis.
 
“We Need Action to Accompany Art” The Boston Globe (June 11, 2020)

This solicited op-ed offers a critical lens to view state-sanctioned public art as “black aesthetic emplacement.”

“Race and the Quarantined City/What Black America Knows About Quarantine” The New York Times (May 15, 2020)

This solicited op-ed discusses the long history of Black spatial containment and marginalization in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Crafting Selves: Elia Alba’s Supper Club and the Politics of Home(place)” In The Supper Club: by Elia Alba, edited by Sara Reisman, George Bolster, and Anjuli Nanda (Hirmer Publishers, 2019)

This chapter explore the role of blackness, aesthetics, and black representation in Elia Alba’s art practice. The essay draws on bell hooks’ essay “Homeplace: A Site of Resistance,” to imagine Alba’s Supper Club as a radically subversive environment.

“‘Housing is a Natural Right, Not a Privilege’: Anti-Gentrification Activism in a Chocolate” City
The Funambulist, Issue 22 (March 2019)


This solicited essay discusses the Black struggle against gentrification in Washington, D.C., and various organizations, initiatives, policy, and ongoing cultural activities that address the socio-spatial shift in D.C.’s landscape, primarily due to gentrification-induced displacement and dispossession.


Black Aesthetic/Aesthetic Black: Race, Space, and the Possibilities of Becoming
Public Seminar (May 2018)

This solicited piece discusses the productivity of blackness, and the mutual constitution of “black aesthetics” and “blackness as an aesthetic.”


“Black Lives Under Surveillance”
Public Books (December 2016)

A review essay on Simone Browne’s Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness and Keeanga-Yamhatta Taylor’s From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation that draws connections between race, surveillance, and capitalism.

“Black Erotics: A Conversation”
YoYo (so4 2012)

An interview with Jennifer Christine Nash and Mireille Miller-Young on racialized pornography, pleasure, and the politics of representation.
Brandi T. Summers, Ph.D.
cover images by Bethanie Hines
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